SEDS UCSD: Ignus-II Static Fire

SEDS UCSD conducted the second successful test fire of their 3D printed Ignus-II bi-propellant rocket engine, running it through its full duration burn of 11 seconds. Producing ~800lbf of thrust and fueled by liquid oxygen and kerosene, Ignus-II is the 2nd generation engine of its namesake and will power the team’s Vulcan-II rocket to 45,000 ft.

Video Caption: Colossus, SEDS’s mobile rocket engine test stand, conducting the second firing of our Ignus-II Engine, this time for the full 11-second burn duration!

Because of the igniter design, we hard-started the engine, and because of a procedural error we ran slightly fuel rich for the burn. More details to come as we further analyze the data!

Instagram Pic of the Week

CS: BPM 100 Rocket Engine Update

I was wondering what was happening with this project…

Video Caption: This is an update on our next generation of rocket engines, the BMP100, which will propel our manned Spica rocket above the edge of space. Here we discuss our current progress on the engine design after our initial design project called BPM100 in 100 days.

Copenhagen Suborbitals is the world’s only manned, amateur space program, 100% crowdfunded and nonprofit. In the future, one of us will fly to space on a home built rocket.

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SDSU Rocket Project: LOX/LCH4 Static Fire D

This was the team’s 4th hot fire test of their LOX/LCH4 rocket engine intended to power their Lady Elizabeth rocket in the upcoming FAR MARS competition.

Video Caption: On October 20th, 2018, the SDSU Rocket Project had their fourth static hot fire of a LOX/LCH4 Engine designed for the FAR/Mars Launch Contest. This upload is a compilation of footage capturing the team during the rocket engine test.

MIT Rocket Team: P9100 Motor Test

What a way to start the year! MIT Rocket Team have certainly set the mark for others to follow with the test of their new P motor. Yielding a 15 % performance increase from last year’s tests, delivering a peak thrust of 12,632 N, specific impulse of 74,042 Ns over a burn time of 8 seconds. The motor is intended to power the team’s Hermes II rocket to ~86,000 ft, which will serve as the first stage for a space shot attempt in 2020.

Video Caption: This is the team’s third P motor test, and our most successful one to date. Using only 3 grains, the motor’s volume loading increased. The new propellant formula burned slower, and with better specific impulse. All combined, our various improvements yielded 15% higher performance than last year. We are preparing to fly this motor in March.

https://wikis.mit.edu/confluence/disp…

CU Space Flight Test the UK’s Largest Impulse N2O Rocket Engine

Students of Cambridge University Space Flight have recently tested the UK’s largest impulse Nitrous Oxide-fueled rocket engine. The engine burnt nitrous oxide and High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE), burning for 36 seconds and producing 1496 N of thrust. The engine is intended to power the team’s Marlet 4 rocket, set to launch in 2020 in the hopes of breaking the UK Amateur Rocketry Altitude Record.

Video Caption: Cambridge University Spaceflight’s static test of their custom Pulsar hybrid rocket engine. The engine was designed and built from scratch by members of the society. Producing an impulse of 53,855Ns this is the largest nitrous fueled rocket engine ever fired in the UK.
————————————————————————————– Cambridge University Spaceflight (CUSF) are a student-run engineering society made up of current undergraduates and Ph.D. students at the University of Cambridge. Founded in 2006, CUSF have grown to become leaders in amateur rocketry and high altitude ballooning. contact@cusf.co.uk

BURPG Updates

It has been a while since I have posted something from the Boston University Rocket Propulsion Group, so it is always good to get some new updates from the team.

The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS), built 2017/2018 is capable of taking engines up to 10,000 lbf (44,482 N) and provides for a much more capable test stand than the vertical set up the team had used before.

The team are still aiming for the Karman line, so hopefully, 2019 is the year it builds up to!