CS Recent Engine Testing and Walk-through of Nexø II

As Copenhagen Suborbitals work towards launching their Nexø II this summer, the team have been busy carrying out further BPM5 engine testing and preparing the rocket for flight.

An engine test was recently carried out on May 5th where the main purpose was to verify the code in the engine controller. Five tests were conducted, with the team also experimenting with different fuel mixtures.
You can read more about those tests here, data included!
And check out the full album of the day’s test activities here.

With the upcoming launch, the team have provided a walkthrough video of the rocket explaining it’s features. The rocket is a stepping stone towards the much larger and human-rated Spica rocket. To learn more about the rocket you can also check out the team’s info page here.

Video Caption: The Nexø II rocket is up for launch this summer. In this video (Part 1 of 2 ) we walk you through the engine section of the rocket.

If you like our project please go to: http://www.copsub.com/support and sign up as a Copenhagen Suborbitals supporter.

It’s the support from people like you all over the world that makes this project possible!

SEDS at UC San Diego Introduce Ignus-II 3D Printed Rocket Engine

And no better way to test the new test stand than with the new engine!

Purdue SEDS LOX/Methane Flight Engine Hotfire

Check out more info on the rocket here. Make sure to check out the teams Instagram for lots more cool pictures!

Video Caption: NOTE: The small fire on the panel is the solid propellant igniter that shot out, bounced back up, re ignited, and snagged itself on a line.

Follow us on Instagram @purdue_seds.
Boomie Zoomie is Purdue’s liquid rocket that will fly over 30,000 feet using its 1100lbf liquid oxygen – liquid methane engine. The rocket weighs approximately 110 pounds, 6.5 inches in diameter and over 10 feet tall.

The test was conducted at Purdue’s Zucrow Propulsion Labs. We tested on a temporary set up as we prepare to transfer the equipment to a launch trailer.

This was our second hot fire attempt after our liquid oxygen tank failed to pressurize the first time. Unlike the first attempt debris or air got into the condenser and created a blockage restricting the liquid methane flow into the rocket. Instead of scrubbing it was determined we had enough propellant to burn for 5 of the 8 seconds.

This rocket was design and fabricated by Purdue Space Program a section Purdue SEDS.

BPS Signal R2 Now Available

BPS recently tested out a new experimental rocket motor from Aerotech, a G8ST. Producing an average thrust of 8.3N for 17.7s, this was the perfect motor for testing the in-house designed and built Signal avionics TVC package.

Revision 2 of the avionics is now available to buy, so if you are wanting to take your rocketry to the next level, you’ll need this package to guide you!

Video Caption: FLIGHT DATA: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/…

A quick note: While the motor did melt the PLA tube holding it, the rest of the TVC assembly(outer/inner gimbal, servos, linkages) were unaffected. Since the heat of the motor was so intense, it’s unlikely we’ll be able to mitigate it using more liners than were already there. The same goes for using most other plastic FDM materials. For now, we’ll probably cut the burn time down a bit and make sure users have access to extra motor mount tubes, should one of them melt. The motor tubes are incredibly easy to manufacture and replace, and the priority right now is ensuring Signal’s software and UX are top notch.

For more info:
https://twitter.com/joebarnard
http://www.bps.space

Rocket Project at UCLA Shoot for the FAR MARS Prize

Rocket Project at UCLA has become one of the first teams to launch for the FAR MARS prize.

The team launched their Odyssey 2 rocket from the FAR test site on May 5th, unfortunately, ~7-8s into the flight while travelling at ~ Mach 1 the vehicle was lost due to a RUD (Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly). The team believe this was caused due to torsion on a welded fitting to the fuel tank.
Building and flying a liquid fuelled rocket is no mean feat, so a fantastic achievement from the team and they are not stopping here, the team plan to be back next year to have another shot at the prize.

Stratos III Launching July 2018

As a member of the team put it,
“Launching a big rocket from Spain in July, get hyped!”

At 8.2m in length, 0.28m in diameter and producing on average 15kN of thrust for 25s, I could not agree more!!

Check out more info on Stratos III here.