PHX4 Rocket Launch to 200,000ft

The 2 stage rocket was built by Curt von Delius, which was boosted by a CTI N5800 to a CTI N1100 sustainer with an 11 s coast delay. The rocket flew to 244,186 ft MSL, although the GPS units did lockout due to the COCOM speed and altitude limits, the apogee was still able to be calculated.

The flight becomes the first amateur 2 stage launch to break the 200,000 ft barrier.

[Edit, 8/11/2018: The use of the term “2 stage rocket” refers to each stage being powered]

Video Caption: Experience this amazing supersonic near space flight through on board HD video. Curt von Delius’s state of the art PHX4 launched on June 16, 2018 from the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. Accelerating to over 3.5 times the speed of sound the rocket coasted to 46 miles above sea level. This is the highest flight of any amateur two stage rocket. The reusable design was recovered using Disc Gap Band Parachutes and touched down 6.36 miles from launch.

Instagram Pic of the Week

Feed System Design for Pressure Fed Rocket Engines

Continuing on with USC LPL rocket lectures, this second one focuses on the feed system design.
This side of rocket engines is sometimes not heavily covered in the literature out there so this is well worth a watch.

Liquid Rocket Engine Sizing

A great video lecture on Liquid Rocket Engine Sizing from USC LPL.

If you are struggling to get through the basics of Rocket Propulsion Elements, then this presentation is great to have on while flicking through the book!

Introducing the QUARK Rocket Project

Based out of the Federal University of ABC (UFABC) in Brazil the QUARK Rocket Project started in 2016. Focusing on the development of hybrid rockets, the team first entered the Spaceport America Cup in 2017, unfortunately, the team did not get to fly but walked away with maximum points on their technical project report.

In late 2017, teaming up with other universities and the Brazilian Airforce, the group launched a solid-fueled rocket to 12,795 ft, gaining a student altitude record in Brazil.

Fast forward and the 21 strong team, sponsored by PION Labs, a new space startup, continue their development of hybrid rockets, focusing on Nitrous Oxide and an in-house fuel called PWCB to deliver the 650 N of thrust from their Gluon engine. Which up to now has been fired 6 times this year.
The engine will power the teams Gluon 3k3 Mission later this year, which aims to test the remote launch control unit, engine control unit, avionics, and remote fill system, as well as reach an apogee of 1.5 km.

The team has their goals set high, after the Gluon mission the focus will shift to making an attempt at the South American apogee record for an amateur experimental rocket, planning to fly in 2019.

You can find out more about the QUARK Rocket Project by checking out their,
Facebook
YouTube

Instagram Pic of the Week

The Hound Flight Recap

The Tu Wien Space Team have released their preliminary findings on what caused the failure of the sustainer ignition of their “The Hound” rocket. The Rocket was launched at Balls 2018 and was intended to break the current European student and amateur rocketry record.

The fault came down to the team’s onboard electronic module, STARM (Space Team Arming Device). The module is designed to keep the sustainer system safe while the rocket is on the ground, hence prevent motor ignition. The system only sends an open channel command for the igniter when liftoff is detected by an accelerometer. Unfortunately, the module was not wired up correctly and therefore did not detect liftoff, thus not opening the command channel required for sustainer ignition.

The full write up is worth a read with a lot more flight analysis and plans to move forward, read it here.