Stratos IV Launch Delay

As per the below post, the team has decided to reschedule the launch to Summer 2020. Stratos IV is expected to reach the Karman line, they have some fierce competition launching this year so we will have to see how it pans out for that first place!

Stratos IV Design Presentation

I posted earlier that DARE unveiled their new Stratos IV rocket, well watch the official design presentation, what is new and what has changed from Stratos III? Watch below!

Video Caption: A re-recording of the Stratos IV design reveal presentation, the rocket aiming for space in August 2019. Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering is a student-team of Delft University of Technology and one of the largest and most advanced student rocketry teams in the world.

Follow the journey of Stratos IV to space on our social media!
FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/daretudelft
INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/daretudelft
TWITTER: www.twitter.com/daretudelft

Music: “True Love” from Coldplay. All rights reserved to Coldplay.

DARE Unveil Stratos IV

I am a little late to this, but the student team from TU Delft have recently unveiled their new Stratos IV rocket. Stratos III, which launched last year to break the European amateur and student altitude record was lost 20 seconds into flight due to a roll-pitch coupling. Stratos IV will carry on the legacy of its predecessor and will use essentially the same hybrid rocket motor, but with a titanium nozzle, a nitrous mono-propellant thruster roll control system, longer fins, and a more rigid fuselage. With all this taken into account, the rocket will reach 100 km in altitude and thus space. To do this the team plan to launch from Denel Overberg Test Range in South Africa, this is the same place that UKZN’s sounding rocket launched from.

Stratos IV stats
Length: 8.286 m
Diameter: 0.278 m
Dry mass: 101.6 kg
Propellant mass: 226.1 kg
Peak thrust: 26 kN
Burn time: 38 seconds
ISP: 180 seconds

DARE: Parachute Research Group News

As well as designing the recovery systems for the upcoming Stratos IV flight, the team will get a chance to test their systems in the REXUS/BEXUS program, first flight in 2020.

From the REXUS/BEXUS website,

The REXUS/BEXUS programme allows students from universities and higher education colleges across Europe to carry out scientific and technological experiments on research rockets and balloons. Each year, two rockets and two balloons are launched, carrying up to 20 experiments designed and built by student teams.

DARE: Engine Testing and Recent Happenings

The team has also released a newsletter covering what they have been up to recently. Download it here to find out!!

Video Caption: Test 16 of the DHX-400 ‘Nimbus’ hybrid rocket motor for the Stratos IV student built sounding rocket.

Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering is a student-team of Delft University of Technology and one of the largest and most advanced student rocketry teams in the world.

Follow the journey of Stratos IV to space on our social media!

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/daretudelft
INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/daretudelft
TWITTER: www.twitter.com/daretudelft

Instagram Pic of the Week

Instagram Pic of the Week

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Today in our new rubric #TechnologyTuesday we present the injector of our Cryogenic Propulsion Team! ❄️⠀ ⠀ This pintle injector is used to inject liquid oxygen oxidizer and bio-ethanol fuel in the combustion chamber where the fluids react. During an engine test, the copper pintle allows a flow of roughly 660 grams per second of liquid oxygen in radial direction. Around the pintle a film of ethanol is formed, which is injected axially at a rate of roughly 440 grams per second. The reaction of these propellants results in a thrust of 250 kg and a temperature in the chamber of over 3000 degrees Celsius!⠀ ⠀ #rocket #rockets #engineering #daretudelft #amazing #cool #injectors #technology #student #tech #cryogenic #propulsion

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