The Hound Flight Recap

The Tu Wien Space Team have released their preliminary findings on what caused the failure of the sustainer ignition of their “The Hound” rocket. The Rocket was launched at Balls 2018 and was intended to break the current European student and amateur rocketry record.

The fault came down to the team’s onboard electronic module, STARM (Space Team Arming Device). The module is designed to keep the sustainer system safe while the rocket is on the ground, hence prevent motor ignition. The system only sends an open channel command for the igniter when liftoff is detected by an accelerometer. Unfortunately, the module was not wired up correctly and therefore did not detect liftoff, thus not opening the command channel required for sustainer ignition.

The full write up is worth a read with a lot more flight analysis and plans to move forward, read it here.

The Hound Flight Recap

This past weekend, students from the TU Wien Space Team successfully launched their Hound rocket from the Balls 2018 rocket event in the Nevada desert. Aiming to break the European student altitude record of 32.3 km, set in 2016 by the University of Stuttgart Team, HyEnD.

The Hound, a 2 stage minimum diameter rocket, unfortunately, suffered a failed upper stage ignition and only reached 13 km, short of the record and short of the Karman line. Not all was lost, this was the highest altitude obtained by the team, so I am sure they will be back to try again.

The Hound – pre flight video

The rocket is expected to launch this Saturday (as in pretty soon actually!) and all going well break the European student altitude record, which currently stands at 32.3 km.

You can follow the team’s progress and updates on their Facebook, Instagram and of course website.

Video Caption: The launch of “the Hound” is happening soon! Watch our trip to the Black Rock Desert in Nevada.

The expected launch window will be 16-20 UTC

Stay tuned on our Social Media Channels (Instagram, Twitter, Facebook)

The Hound – Recovery

The team at TU Wien Space Team continue their video series on their Hound rocket as they prepare to break the European Student Altitude record in a couple of weeks.

Video Caption: When people talk about an experimental rocket, they are mostly interested in the propulsion, rocket hardware or the maximum altitude that can be reached. The safe recovery is sometimes disregarded, however, it is equally important.

Today, Christian Plasounig is going to talk about our recovery system and the backups, which will ensure a safe landing of “The Hound”.

Special thanks to Julian Propst and his Team, who supported us with our Promotion Videos. https://www.facebook.com/Rockingvienna/

The Hound – Mechanics and Test Flights

The launch from Black Rock is expected to take place in 2 weeks time, the team is aiming to smash the 32.3 km current European student altitude record.

Video Caption: If our rocket performs as we expect, we reach an altitude that is beyond the “von Karman line”. A rocket which has to fly up to the desired heights experiences lots of stresses that don’t need to be considered for lower altitudes. These include the mechanical and thermal stresses at hypersonic speeds, engine ignition under reduced pressure, and apogee detection in a vacuum, to name a few. To overcome these problems, many components needed a special design.

Our head of mechanics, Andreas Bauernfeind, will tell you about the design, manufacturing and testing of the rocket that shall break records.

Link to our homepage: http://spaceteam.at/2018/09/09/the-ho…

Special thanks to Julian Propst and his Team, who supported us with our Promotion Videos. https://www.facebook.com/Rockingvienna/

A Look at The Hound Avionics

As posted earlier, the TU Wien Space Team are gearing up to launch their Hound rocket from Black Rock desert in Nevada near the end of September in an attempt to break the European student altitude record.

In this video, the team goes over the avionics package used to conduct such a flight.

TU Wien Space Team Shooting for the European Student Altitude Record

With the recent launch anomaly suffered by DARE and their Stratos III rocket, the European student altitude record still stands at 32.3 km, set by the University of Stuttgart HyEnD team with their HEROS 3 rocket in 2016. But this may soon be broken by another team!

In a few weeks, the TU Wien Space Team will travel to the Black Rock desert in Nevada to attempt to break this record.
Dubbed ‘The Hound‘ the minimum diameter 2 stage rocket is boosted on a 98 mm COTS motor followed by a 75 mm COTS sustainer motor. The team has designed the rocket to reach 100 km, therefore breaking all records and hence the launch from Black Rock.

The launch is expected to occur on the weekend of 21st September 2018.

You can follow the team on,
Facebook
Instagram
Twitter or their Website.