Stratos III Launching July 2018

As a member of the team put it,
“Launching a big rocket from Spain in July, get hyped!”

At 8.2m in length, 0.28m in diameter and producing on average 15kN of thrust for 25s, I could not agree more!!

Check out more info on Stratos III here.

DHX-400 ‘Nimbus’ Hybrid Rocket Motor Test #7

Video Caption: A student society that builds a record-breaking engine powerful enough to lift an SUV? Check out the seventh engine test video where we successfully tested a 3D printed titanium nozzle!

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!
http://www.facebook.com/Delft/AerospaceRocketEngineering
http://www.twitter.com/DARE_TUDelft

DARE Phoenix Engine Tests

Video Caption: Do you want to stay updated? Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!
https://www.facebook.com/DelftAerospa…
https://twitter.com/DARE_TUDelft
https://www.instagram.com/daretudelft/

In this video summary, you can see the three tests performed by Project Phoenix: The hybrid engine team within DARE. The engine fired in test 1 shows a thermal failure at 5.6 seconds. Engines fired in test 2 and 3 show a successful burn.

DARE Drogue Deployment Testing

Video Caption: Do you want to stay updated? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

https://www.facebook.com/DelftAerospa…
https://twitter.com/dare_tudelft

In this video, you can see the Drogue Deployment Test of the Stratos III recovery team.

DARE Small Scale Engine Tests

Video Caption: With Stratos III, DARE wants to become the first student society to reach space. To get this high, a powerful engine needs to be designed and built! This video is a compilation of the small-scale tests we have done.

Do you want to know more about DARE or do you want to get updated when we upload a new video? Click the subscribe button and check out our website dare.tudelft.nl !

Update on the Stratos III engine!

Updated 28/1/17

DARE: Stratos II+ Data Analysis

The students of DARE have been running through the data produced by last year’s launch of Stratos II+. The rocket achieved a peak altitude of 21.5km, considerably short of the 50km as estimated by the team. This anomaly was soon found to be due to an inaccurate estimation of the drag in the simulations, as well as a vortex in the nitrous tank being created as the rocket rotated on its ascent which caused the engine to burn gaseous, not liquid Nitrous Oxide, resulting in underperformance on the engine.

The rocket achieved a peak altitude of 21.5km, considerably short of the 50km as estimated by the team, but in doing so breaking the European student altitude record. This anomaly was soon found to be due to an inaccurate estimation of the drag in the simulations, as well as a vortex in the nitrous tank being created as the rocket rotated on its ascent which caused the engine to burn gaseous, not liquid Nitrous Oxide, resulting in underperformance on the engine.

You can continue to read the full flight evaluation here.

Flight video can be found here.