CS: We All Need Some Space

This is a great new video series showcasing members of Copenhagen Suborbitals, first up, Mads Stenfatt, parachute lead.

Video Caption: We (All) Need Some Space is a video series depicting stories about Copenhagen Suborbitals volunteers’ – their everyday life and passion for Space.

This is the first episode telling a story about our parachute lead and astronaut candidate Mads Stenfatt.

We highly encourage you to drop any of your questions for Mads in the comments for an upcoming Q&A session with him.

Music by Everyday Astronaut – http://www.everydayastronaut.com

Stratos IV Design Presentation

I posted earlier that DARE unveiled their new Stratos IV rocket, well watch the official design presentation, what is new and what has changed from Stratos III? Watch below!

Video Caption: A re-recording of the Stratos IV design reveal presentation, the rocket aiming for space in August 2019. Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering is a student-team of Delft University of Technology and one of the largest and most advanced student rocketry teams in the world.

Follow the journey of Stratos IV to space on our social media!
FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/daretudelft
INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/daretudelft
TWITTER: www.twitter.com/daretudelft

Music: “True Love” from Coldplay. All rights reserved to Coldplay.

DARE Unveil Stratos IV

I am a little late to this, but the student team from TU Delft have recently unveiled their new Stratos IV rocket. Stratos III, which launched last year to break the European amateur and student altitude record was lost 20 seconds into flight due to a roll-pitch coupling. Stratos IV will carry on the legacy of its predecessor and will use essentially the same hybrid rocket motor, but with a titanium nozzle, a nitrous mono-propellant thruster roll control system, longer fins, and a more rigid fuselage. With all this taken into account, the rocket will reach 100 km in altitude and thus space. To do this the team plan to launch from Denel Overberg Test Range in South Africa, this is the same place that UKZN’s sounding rocket launched from.

Stratos IV stats
Length: 8.286 m
Diameter: 0.278 m
Dry mass: 101.6 kg
Propellant mass: 226.1 kg
Peak thrust: 26 kN
Burn time: 38 seconds
ISP: 180 seconds

BPS.space: Model Rocket Reaction Control System

Video Caption:
Parts links and 3D files: https://www.patreon.com/posts/rcs-par…
Charlie Garcia: https://twitter.com/Chuck0Garcia https://www.youtube.com/user/dragonri…

For more info: https://twitter.com/joebarnard
https://twitter.com/bps_space
https://www.instagram.com/bps.space/
https://www.facebook.com/bps.space/
http://www.bps.space

A busy Weekend for Rocket Project at UCLA

Video Caption: During our tests the weekend of February 16th 2019 at MTA and FAR, we successfully tested our new Fuel and Liquid Oxygen tanks in two separate static fires. This video is of our second fire, using our newly built Thin-Walled Combustion Chamber. Due to a small issue in the building of this new combustion chamber, hot combustion gases built up in a small gap, causing the outward flames seen in the video. Thanks for watching and subscribe to see the launch of this Liquid-Propellant system in only a couple of weeks!

Video Caption: Over this past weekend of the 16th of February 2019, The Prometheus hybrid system successfully static fired at the FAR Facility! Thanks to their continuous hard work on their propulsion system, they got to see their engine light up the desert!

Why SpaceX is Building a Stainless Steel Starship

I am posting this video as I think it is pretty relevant to the amateur/experimental community. Aluminium in some form or another has been the go-to for aerospace projects but one must look at all the pros and cons of a material for its intended purpose to make the best decision. As you will see in the video, stainless steel is quite suited for what SpaceX is hoping to do.

So, I challenge you to think a bit more next time you carry out a material selection process. You may end up back at the tried and true materials but you might also surprise yourself and find others are more suited for your application.

[For those who want more: The plots in the video of the materials are called Ashby plots and are commonly used for material selection, you may recall them from your materials science papers at university. There is software you can buy that displays these graphs and with user inputs allows you to pick the best material for your application.]