TU Wien Space Team Aim for the Karman line and the European Altitude Record

Vienna (TU WIEN) – The Space Team of the Vienna University of Technology wants to know it again: in Nevada (USA) two rockets are launched, which are to reach record-breaking heights.

If everything works out perfectly, the rocket should reach a height of over 100 km – the area where the atmosphere gets thin and space begins. The Space Team of the Vienna University of Technology, an association made up of students from different TU disciplines, will attempt to break records in the Nevada desert with two self-developed two-stage rockets. The previous European record for student teams is 32.3 km.

In the last attempt last year, the goal could not yet be achieved. Now the team tries again. The launch is scheduled between 20.9 and 22.9 – updates are posted on the Space Team’s website.

Much know-how at the Vienna University of Technology

The Space Team has already made a number of remarkable achievements. Various rockets have been successfully launched, a mini-satellite has been built and is still sending data from its orbit, a novel mountain system has been developed, with the probes without parachute unscathed from space to return to Earth.

The technical challenges that needed to be overcome for the record attempt are huge:

For about three and a half seconds, the first stage of the rocket burns. This is then separated from the rest and the upper stage continues for fifteen seconds, until it is then ignited at a height of about twelve kilometers. This is made possible by a sophisticated electronics system, which was developed and built by the Space Team.

“This is a challenging task, and there are countless things to consider such as safety and reliability,” says Project Manager Christoph Fröhlich. “The last time we tried a security mechanism was not wired correctly, this year we will launch the rocket again, and in addition we will try a second improved missile in detail, especially the electronic systems and the upper stage ignition have been revised.”

Both rockets are each just under four meters long and weigh (including fuel) each about 30 kg. In the development, it was important to choose the right materials that could withstand extreme loads – such as special glass fiber reinforced polymers. Due to the strong air resistance, the rocket is extremely hot. At atmospheric pressure at sea level, such a rocket would burn, but as the air pressure and thus also the air resistance decreases, the team hopes to surpass the previous European record for student teams of 32.3 km. Achieving a world record is possible, albeit difficult: a team from the University of Southern California has now reached 100 km. “What height we can ideally achieve is hard to say because the simulations come to quite different results. Ultimately, we will only know when we analyze the sensor data after the flight, “says Christoph Fröhlich.

Video Caption: In September of 2018 the TU Wien Space Team launched the two-staged rocket “The Hound” in Nevada, USA. More information under http://spaceteam.at/2018/10/20/the-ho…

CSULB Beach Launch Team static fire

Video Caption: CSULB Beach Launch Team static fires their newest competition engine!

Engine Spec:
Nickname: “Freyja”
Nominal Thrust: 600 Lbf
Nominal Burn: 15 seconds
Propellants: LOX & JET-A
Injector Type: Pintle
Feeding System: Pressure Fed
Cooling Method: Ablative Cooling

DARE: Radiation Heat Transfer in a Rocket Nozzle

Video Caption: Test 20 of the DHX-400 ‘Nimbus’ hybrid rocket engine, for the Stratos IV project, demonstrating the successful use of a 3D printed titanium composite nozzle structure, with a graphite insert. Find the full test footage at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ng8iX….

Delft Aerospace Rocket Engineering is one of the largest and most advanced student rocketry teams in the world. As a Dreamteam of Delft University of Technology, we aim at providing students with a hands-on experience that is unique in this world. Next to our Stratos and Aether flagship projects, the DARE conducts fundamental research in all fields of sounding rocketry, such as propulsion, recovery, control, structural design and recovery.

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ERIG: Hydra 4X Test

The video’s show the HYDRA 4X hybrid rocket motor testing from the Fall and Summer of 2018.

ERIG is a team of students from the Technical University of Braunschweig, developing and constructing experimental rockets. HYDRA 4X produces 2000 N of thrust and will burn for 15 s propelling the team’s FAUST II rocket to 10 km in altitude.

ERAU Rocket Development Lab: Janus Liquid Rocket Engine Hot Fire

The LOX/Jet-A engine utilises a pintle injector, ablative combustion chamber and produces 1000 lbf (4448 N). The engine and test cell were entirely built by students!

Follow the student team on Twitter for all the latest updates!

 

WIRED USCRPL Interview

USC RPL is getting some great coverage about their Traveler IV spaceshot, which became the first student-designed and built rocket to surpass the Karman line.

Read the Wired article here or watch the video below!

Video Caption: A team from the University of Southern California’s Rocket Propulsion Laboratory became the first student team to launch a rocket into space. WIRED’s Arielle Pardes spoke with Neil Tewksbury, the team’s Lead Operations Officer, about what it took to make it happen. Read more of the team’s story on WIRED.com: https://www.wired.com/story/a-rocket-…

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Meet the First College Students to Launch a Rocket Into Space | WIRED