2018 Year in Review

Photo by NordWood Themes on Unsplash

This year has probably seen the most space shot/altitude record attempts of any year since I started this website, thus it has made for an exciting year in amateur and student rocketry.

As well as these I’ll highlight my most memorable events of 2018.

Spaceshots and altitude records

2018 saw three (that I am aware of) space shots and two European student and amateur altitude record attempts.
Starting with the Princeton SpaceShot team, whom in May launched their two-stage SpaceShot rocket from Spaceport America hoping to be the first student team to reach space. Unfortunately, the 2nd stage did not ignite and the rocket coasted to 50,000 ft before being successfully recovered. A second space shot is in the works, so look out for this team in 2019!

Princeton Space Shot launch (Credit: Doug Gerrard)

Up next was the launch of Stratos III from DARE in July, aiming to reclaim the European student altitude record. The 15 kN thrust, 8.2 m long hybrid rocket, unfortunately, disintegrated 20 seconds into flight from its launch location in Spain, an official report on the cause has yet to be released. The team never the less are powering forward with Stratos IV in full development which is expected to fly to 100 km before the end of August in 2019.

Stratos III and team (Credit: DARE)

USCRPL once again tried for another space shot, Traveler III was the team’s 3rd attempt and with all their experience to date looked to be the one to break the record for a student launch to space. Unfortunately, a communications protocol error led to the rocket launching without the avionics package turned on, therefore no telemetry or recovery was possible. The rocket was heard to come in ballistic and knowing the time delays along with simulations, Traveler III was predicted to have reached space. The team continues work on Traveler IV for another shot in 2019!

Traveller III launch (Credit: USCRPL)

TU Wien Space Team launched their first attempt to break the European student altitude record and even to reach space. The Hound, the team’s 2-stage rocket lifted off from the Black Rocket desert in Nevada on September 24th, hoping to smash the University of Stuttgart’s current European altitude record and also reach space. Unfortunately (the word of this post) the sustainer failed to ignite due to an incorrectly wired igniter fail safe for when the rocket is on the pad, the unlit sustainer coasted to 42,650 ft before being successfully recovered along with the booster.

The Hound Launch Team (Credit: TU Wien Space Team)

FAR MARS Prize
When this was announced it looked to be the perfect stepping stone for student and university teams’ wanting to progress their liquid rocket development in what seemed like an achievable prize. It did succeed in progressing liquid rocket engine development, especially LOX/Methane but the timeline proved to short with only the UCLA Rocket Project attempting a launch for the competition.

That launch only lasted ~7 seconds before the Odyssey II rocket had a rapid disassembly mid-flight. This was pinned down to torsion on a welded fitting on the fuel tank.

For an added $50k of prize money you could attempt the competition with a LOX/Methane rocket engine, two teams pursued this and had some very successful engine tests. The SDSU Rocket Project successfully tested both a regenerative and ablative engine, Purdue SEDS had great success with their Boomie Zoomie rocket which featured an innovative coaxial tank design and ablative 1125 lbf (5004 N) engine.

Most of the teams’ will be trying again for 2019, with the first launch dates scheduled for early March, hopefully, all teams’ make it to the launch pad, follow here to stay on the pulse!

Flight of the Falcon Heavy…the BPS.space one 😉
Voted on my Twitter poll as the best rocketry event of 2018, Joe of BPS.space does not fail to deliver.

Truly a feat of engineering, the 1/48 scale rocket featured active guidance with 3-DOF at liftoff, booster separation and an actively guided 2nd stage. The rocket demonstrated the advanced capability from the in house designed and built Signal flight computer, of which you can purchase for yourself!. Joe has a whole series of videos covering the build so I suggest you go over and check out his YouTube channel to catch up!
Keep a watch out on BPS.space for 2019, I am sure Joe has a whole bunch more epic projects in the works, for a fact I know he does!

The Rest
Other notable events of 2018 included the launch of Nexo II from Copenhagen Suborbitals and the beginning of the BPM-100 rocket engine campaign that will power their manned Spica rocket to 100 km. Curt von Delius launched his 2-stage PHX4 rocket to over 200,000 ft in June, the video is worth a watch!. The MIT Rocket Team launched their Hermes 1 rocket to 32,400 ft, the entirely in-house built rocket and motor performed flawlessly. SEDS at UCSD completed their Colossus test stand and hot fired their Ignus-II 3D printed bi-propellant rocket engine.

And to round it all out I successfully tested my spark torch igniter culminating in 14 tests, a ton of data and a very happy chap.

2019 promises to be a very exciting year, with more space shot attempts from old and new teams early in the year, will 2019 be the year a student team reaches space?
Keep visiting Mach 5 Lowdown to find out and thanks for all the support for 2018!

The Hound Flight Recap

The Tu Wien Space Team have released their preliminary findings on what caused the failure of the sustainer ignition of their “The Hound” rocket. The Rocket was launched at Balls 2018 and was intended to break the current European student and amateur rocketry record.

The fault came down to the team’s onboard electronic module, STARM (Space Team Arming Device). The module is designed to keep the sustainer system safe while the rocket is on the ground, hence prevent motor ignition. The system only sends an open channel command for the igniter when liftoff is detected by an accelerometer. Unfortunately, the module was not wired up correctly and therefore did not detect liftoff, thus not opening the command channel required for sustainer ignition.

The full write up is worth a read with a lot more flight analysis and plans to move forward, read it here.

The Hound Flight Recap

This past weekend, students from the TU Wien Space Team successfully launched their Hound rocket from the Balls 2018 rocket event in the Nevada desert. Aiming to break the European student altitude record of 32.3 km, set in 2016 by the University of Stuttgart Team, HyEnD.

The Hound, a 2 stage minimum diameter rocket, unfortunately, suffered a failed upper stage ignition and only reached 13 km, short of the record and short of the Karman line. Not all was lost, this was the highest altitude obtained by the team, so I am sure they will be back to try again.

The Hound – Recovery

The team at TU Wien Space Team continue their video series on their Hound rocket as they prepare to break the European Student Altitude record in a couple of weeks.

Video Caption: When people talk about an experimental rocket, they are mostly interested in the propulsion, rocket hardware or the maximum altitude that can be reached. The safe recovery is sometimes disregarded, however, it is equally important.

Today, Christian Plasounig is going to talk about our recovery system and the backups, which will ensure a safe landing of “The Hound”.

Special thanks to Julian Propst and his Team, who supported us with our Promotion Videos. https://www.facebook.com/Rockingvienna/

The Hound – Mechanics and Test Flights

The launch from Black Rock is expected to take place in 2 weeks time, the team is aiming to smash the 32.3 km current European student altitude record.

Video Caption: If our rocket performs as we expect, we reach an altitude that is beyond the “von Karman line”. A rocket which has to fly up to the desired heights experiences lots of stresses that don’t need to be considered for lower altitudes. These include the mechanical and thermal stresses at hypersonic speeds, engine ignition under reduced pressure, and apogee detection in a vacuum, to name a few. To overcome these problems, many components needed a special design.

Our head of mechanics, Andreas Bauernfeind, will tell you about the design, manufacturing and testing of the rocket that shall break records.

Link to our homepage: http://spaceteam.at/2018/09/09/the-ho…

Special thanks to Julian Propst and his Team, who supported us with our Promotion Videos. https://www.facebook.com/Rockingvienna/

A Look at The Hound Avionics

As posted earlier, the TU Wien Space Team are gearing up to launch their Hound rocket from Black Rock desert in Nevada near the end of September in an attempt to break the European student altitude record.

In this video, the team goes over the avionics package used to conduct such a flight.